Back in July, I put a call out on Twitter asking people to tag businesses, entrepreneurs, influencers, anyone really who has a killer personal brand. The response I got was epic!

In fact, I was so surprised by all the comments I received that I decided to dig a little deeper and contact each of the people mentioned to find out a bit more about them. This blog post is the culmination of what I learnt and not only serves to add value in terms of branding, but also act as a thank you to everyone who was involved.

I’ve decided not to focus just on personal brands, but extend the invitation to participate to local brands who have strong core values and are driven by their owner/community!

Here’s what I asked each of them:

  1. What does your brand stand for? How did you go around creating your brand and making sure it gets the right message across and connects with the right people?
  2. What is the no. 1 thing that makes a brand or a person memorable in your opinion? Who would you nominate to this list and why?

And here’s what they said…

Joe Glover – The Marketing Meetup

1. What does your brand stand for?

The Marketing Meetup branding is all about humanity, love, and community – to start, these were my own values but over time they’ve become bigger than me and are strong features of a community of incredible people. Our values reflect how business interactions are better conducted in a human way first and foremost. 

The brand is reinforced at events every month across the country, and is the central thread which brings together disparate communities. The people who engage with the Marketing Meetup are self-selecting: we place out a whole bunch of content into the world, and people choose whether to engage with it or not. More than anything, our strong message about love and humanity will put off some people which is absolutely fine: but for the people who like it, they really like it! Good brands do that: they have a strong enough message that people engage with them on an emotional level.

A brand is simply a promise of something. In our case, it’s the promise of learning, lovely people, and positively lovely environments to do it in.

2. Who would you nominate to this list and why?

Jon Torrens – The amount of conversations I’ve had about people not feeling too confident about presentations only for the other person to go… ‘have you met that Jon Torrens chap? He’s brilliant.’

@ChrisSpalton – Mutual love in here but your own brand of no-nonsense, simple, common sense but also inspirational demeanour is refreshing and a pleasure to be around.

Ann Hawkins – annhawkins.com

1. What does your brand stand for?

My personal brand stands for transparency, inclusion and lack of pretension. It is the ultimate “it’s not about me” brand. Everything I do is to help other people shine – but only if I believe in them! Quality is more important than quantity. I express my brand in everything I say and do so people are either attracted or put off and that’s good as I don’t work with people who don’t share my values.

2. Who would you nominate to this list and why?

The things that attract me in other people (and those I added to your list) are openness, their values, their humour and their humanity. I’m intensely curious so people who are interested in a wide variety of things appeal to me.

@KathBeeBee @AbiStevens_Art @a_caggiano @ideopathic @callumfairhurst @Audiosilver @CLoughlan @ClaireMartinsen @Edwilliamsswim @plcowley @ChambersLeigh @PrattStuff @christheowl @nicksireau @DianaProbst @ShoesieQ @ginibee123 @thegoodplantco1 plus more who aren’t on Twitter!

Jagged Matt – jaggedmatt.com

1. What does your brand stand for?

My goal is to continue to coach women who are making and shaping amazing and positive changes in our world. By helping them with their public speaking, their message can be heard and remembered. For this reason, my brand needed to be a voice that is enthusiastic and encouraging. 

In public speaking, there’s a tendency to over-plan. I’m not one of those people. The fact that I rock up ready to go without extensive planning, either inspires people or makes them incredibly envious! I wanted to help women to forget about perfection, and to show us who they are now. Instead of being perfect, being imperfect and ‘Jagged’ should be celebrated. As well as speaking, my writings demonstrate this, how I share the events I’m running, and my use of craft. I think that being perceived as someone who does lots of things is more inspiring than someone who never shares their work.

Writing down brand values never worked for me, I can’t box myself. Instead, I was honest with myself by asking:

  1. Who do I like being? 
  2. What do I like doing?

The answers made it clear how to communicate online. I love being someone who uplifts people and makes them smile (I can’t walk into a shop without putting on a performance for the staff). I also like thinking deeply about subjects and finding new solutions to problems. Therefore that’s what I needed to do for my image, communications, and for my book. 

The things I love doing like arts and crafts, and making people personal videos, informed how I would express my personality. If you do things to cheer your friends up, why not also do it for your clients and audience? Sending a voice clip takes 30 seconds, but can mean the world to someone having a bad day. 

I used to write long essays for friends, so I used that hobby. I also think about public speaking and performance every day, therefore writing blogs is easy. I would do it anyway!

Use the things that you would do even if no one was watching!

2. How did you go around creating your brand and making sure it gets the right message across and connects with the right people?

I was very fortunate to be friends with essentially my ideal client. As she read my blog daily and had long discussions with me about it I was able to see what worked. People often get hung up on finding their writer’s voice (or in this case their brand identity) but for me it was natural. I imagined I was having an in-depth conversation with my friend and answering the questions she might have. When we talked for real, I would see what things caught her attention. That formed the outline of Empowering Your Public Speaking. 

As I coach women (and because I like being different) unlike most writers, I favour using female pronouns (she/her) and my examples feature female characters. It might sound simple, but in books most examples are male-dominated. I wanted my readers to be able to imagine themselves in different public speaking situations, which is hard to do if you’re always being told, “This is what John did…” 

What gets me fired up the most is not new advice. It’s new questions and problems. When I encounter new questions, I go on the hunt for new answers, which I then share. If you pretend you know everything, your brand and business will have no real momentum. Always be on the hunt for new problems to solve and to plant your flag in. Keep moving.

My philosophy is: I would rather be myself and have some people love what I do, than be bland and be kind of liked by everyone. This might sound like a cliché but by doing it, it means you get to work with people who you get on with and who really inspire you. Some people just can’t handle my enthusiasm or they disagree with my approach, and that is totally fine. You need clients who you can be yourself with, and who (cliché again) admire you for who you are.

3. What is the no. 1 thing that makes a brand or a person memorable in your opinion? 

Do they listen?

I had my fair share of being coached by others. What bugged me the most was not being listened to. The trainers were so preoccupied with showing off their clever ideas that they didn’t listen to what my problem was. 

You might have amazing ideas. That’s fantastic. However if you want to truly connect with people and help them you need to ask more, and listen more. 

When working with a client: Ask for their thoughts and call on their intuition. 

On social media: don’t just shout out your accomplishments. Invite people in with questions, consider their answers, and give genuine responses that will help them.

4. Who would you nominate to this list and why?

I met Cara Vincens on a mastermind hosted by Amy Landino, and we really hit it off. Cara replies in the most genuine and uplifting way. Her use of video is incredible (it got me using planners). If you need some positive craft in your life, get to know Cara.  

Tim Lewis, really does listen to his followers. As an example, I once was having trouble with Twitter audio, I asked for help, and he connected me with someone who had the answer. Twitter audio wasn’t available on Android! As Tim shows, listening and helping makes you incredibly likeable. 

Tim Lewis, really does listen to his followers. As an example, I once was having trouble with Twitter audio, I asked for help, and he connected me with someone who had the answer. Twitter audio wasn’t available on Android! As Tim shows, listening and helping makes you incredibly likeable. 

Sarah Clay’s Friday Instagram Live interviews have been amazing. By giving her viewers the chance to ask other freelancers questions, she has helped us greatly. Her positivity and rhyming intro (“Hey, hey, it’s Sarah Clay,”) made it a highlight of my Friday. 

May King Tsang is such fun to interact with! To engage in humorous conversation with someone you need to pay attention, and you need to think (you can’t just paste stock answers). Every interaction with her has been memorable and entertaining.

I find it inspiring how Goldie Chan uses photos and video so regularly. I’m a big fan of colour, and interesting visuals, and she always delivers. What I also like is how Goldie has helped to promote others (including me) through her social media. 

And of course my friend and fellow rock fan, Katja. She has been mentoring me on how to use LinkedIn. Katja showed me how most people don’t even have a cover image, which is nuts. Two remarkable things Katja does: Firstly she goes out of her way to send people positive replies and to take part in conversations (she gives a lot of her time). Secondly, she connects people and promotes others. Such positivity and generosity do not go unnoticed! 

Richard Slade – The Neotists

1. What does your brand stand for? How did you go around creating your brand and making sure it gets the right message across and connects with the right people?

Our brand (the Neotists) was developed as a response to a clear lack of creativity in the St Neots area. When we began talking about the idea of creating a community of like-minded creatives in 2015 we looked around at what other nearby towns were up to and Bedford Creative Arts and Cam Creatives both had very clear goals and well-developed audiences. 

In St Neots, we were starting from scratch. So the brand had to be more about creating a revolution and so I developed a logo using a simple black, white and red palette — this seems to be the anarchic and revolutionary colours used in the twentieth century and worked well to get the right message across. 

I began looking for creatives and after collecting a few asked for their suggests for a name for the group. We then published a poll and asked for votes.

It was vital that the members feel like they are part of creating this community. So once the name and brand were formed, we set about creating a professional-looking website using the colour scheme as well as applying the brand across other platforms and material. 

My background is in brand creation and development so this part came naturally. Other creatives have supported us along the way with their time by attending and volunteering, photographing and video-making, writing and producing as well as spreading the word. 

The collective has grown to over 300 members, mainly through word-of-mouth and we’ve been able to build a respected brand, all on little or no budget. 

2. What is the no. 1 thing that makes a brand or a person memorable in your opinion? Who would you nominate to this list and why?

Honest and well designed. As citizens in the first-world, we now expect a level of excellence as standard, from the books we read, the apps we download and the toys our children play. They all need to be aesthetically pleasing, fully-functional, without glitches or loss of connection, and robust and well-built for those tiny hands that can break almost any device. 

The brand identity is an integral part of this level of excellence. We now expect every logo, icon and image to be pixel-perfect, and vitally a small local brand must be able to withstand our scrutiny as very often they appear side-by-side in our feeds, timelines and articles alongside the biggest brands in the world. 

Nominees: Pentagram — for the sheer scope and quality of design,  Slack — for their elegant and seamless delivery across many platforms. Daniel Benneworth-Gray, Moose Allain and Ben Terrett — for their ability to subtly self-promote through Twitter, whilst retaining a recognisable and natural flow.

Adrian Storey – Uchujin

1. What does your brand stand for? How did you go around creating your brand and making sure it gets the right message across and connects with the right people?

My brand “Uchujin” is the Japanese word for “Alien”, I decided on it for two reasons, firstly I have spent the best part of the last 20 years living in Asia where if not explicitly referred to as an alien on official documentation I always felt conspicuously other.

Also in many Asian languages “R’s” and “L’s” are difficult to distinguish in spoken language so the R in my name “Adrian” was often flattened to an L, resulting in “Alien”

The Japanese calligraphy on my main site (www.uchujin.co.uk) which reads “UCHUJIN” is by an internationally exhibited  Japanese calligraphy artist, Hiroyuki Nakajima, who I became friends with during the filming of the award-winning feature documentary on contemporary calligraphy “Traces Of The Soul” (www.tracesofthesoul.com). I love the obviously hand-painted, but masterfully skilful feel of it as a logo.

I choose the red and black colour scheme as I wanted the branding to stand out from the usual black/white colours of other photographers/videographers websites and thought it was visually striking.

My business card features the Japanese calligraphy in red on a black background and always seems to draw attention from people I hand it too far more than a more traditional business card would. It also makes it easier to find when searching through a pile of business cards.

I feel this departure from the normal also makes it (and hence me) more memorable.

I feel this difference in colour and typography highlights that my work is also often focused on people on the edges of society or with unconventional approaches.

It also serves to convey my own somewhat alternative lifestyle choices.

Whilst I obviously do commercial work my main focus is on these areas of alternative or edgy subjects and I feel my branding helps clients to understand I am not a corporate-focused filmmaker whilst still being professional and highly competent.

2. What is the no. 1 thing that makes a brand or a person memorable in your opinion? Who would you nominate to this list and why?

The number one thing that makes a brand or person memorable in my opinion is a very strong consistent visual impact. A superbly crafted design with excellent use of colours to convey something about the brand/person to me immediately.

I would nominate Christian Payne (www.documentally.com) to this list as I feel his brand is visually interesting, consistent and conveys his message in an easy and immediate way.

Pina Broccoli Anaia – One Two Culinary Stew

1. What does your brand stand for? 

My brand stands for my love of food and having a genuine, credible voice. I created One Two Culinary Stew to share my experiences, whether they are in my own kitchen or at eating establishments, particularly Cambridge independents.

2. How did you go around creating your brand and making sure it gets the right message across and connects with the right people? 

To be honest, I never saw myself as a brand. I started One Two Culinary Stew five years ago purely as a hobby (it still is) but the skills I learned running my own business with my husband Paulo definitely came in handy. We created a brand for our company P A Safety Management Limited that is closely associated with Paulo’s expertise and integrity (he’s the face behind the initials). 

When I created the blog, that process must have been in my sub-conscious. I knew I had to do the foundation work to get started on the right foot, transmit a clear message and have that all-important consistency to keep readers interested. It was also crucial to have an About Me section on my blog as people connect and engage better with you when they know who you are, what motivates you and why you are putting yourself out there.   

When I realised that the blog and my social media platforms were taking off, I had a designer create my logo and upgrade my website to reflect my chosen colours – one of which was Cambridge blue. My designer also created a “buzz card” for my blog, featuring the logo, my first name, website, email and social media handles. I give out the cards when people ask for more info on my blog or at social events, which is a great way of connecting with fellow foodies and businesses.

I started from zero, with only friends and family reading my blog. It’s been a slow but steady growth over the past 5+ years and what’s helped me the most in connecting with the right audience has been people and businesses sharing, retweeting and reposting my content and ensuring my posts and photos are tagged/credited. 

To gain exposure, I try to put myself out in the media (radio, print, other websites) once in a while. I added a Media section to my website which helps build credibility.

3. What is the no. 1 thing that makes a brand or a person memorable in your opinion? 

Engagement – engaging with followers and customers keeps the brand at the forefront of people’s minds.

4. Who would you nominate to this list and why?

There are so many wonderful people and businesses in Cambridge doing their branding right. They have a key message or a memorable logo. It’s clear who they are and what they offer, which really makes then stand out. I would need to write a book to name them all so I’ll focus on just three.

Heidi White has a great personal brand, which she initially built through her food blog The Moving Foodie and writing for magazines. She is the organiser of the Eat Cambridge festival and founder of foodPark, Cambridge’s very first street food collective championing independent food trucks and local producers in an organised and professional way. Although foodPark has now changed hands, Heidi continues to be synonymous with the Cambridge food scene.

Amélie, the Flammekueche restaurant at Food Social in The Grafton, has branded remarkably well given the challenges of introducing a food not well-known in the UK, and they have done it in a respectful way. They were clear from the outset that Flammekueche is not pizza and their take on it (Flam-kuche) pays homage to this classic Alsatian dish. The addition of a yellow Citroen H van, which is immobile and serves as the bar, catches the eye of shoppers. There is a strong connection to the French family (the Crépys) who run this restaurant, so their engagement is genuine. The A in their logo (designed by Amélie herself) looks like The Eiffel Tower, which I think is incredibly clever.

BrewBoard, a relatively new brewery based in Cambridgeshire, is going from strength to strength. Apart from having a fantastic product, their copywriting is engaging and the designs on their beer cans are iconic and memorable. The design extends to their van, which effectively takes their branding on the road. The sale of quality t-shirts (the kind people actually want to wear) also contributes to walking advertisements. They make great use of experiential marketing, with regular tours of the brewery and weekly Tap Nights featuring guest street food traders as well as DJs or live music.

Anne-Marie Miller – Carbon Orange

1. What does your brand stand for? 

As Carbon Orange we define our brand as:

  • Kick-ass women who are great mates
  • We’ve got this – our years of experience means our clients are in safe hands
  • We go about what we do with humour

My personal brand is wrapped up in all that too, plus in my personal output, I tend to share more about what I’m learning. And I’m not scared to put my vulnerabilities out there as well.

2. How did you go around creating your brand and making sure it gets the right message across and connects with the right people? 

For Carbon Orange, we went through a process (helped by Andrew and Pete’s book) to define what felt true to us. 

Personally, it happened more organically. I was very inspired by Chris Spalton’s talk at the Marketing Meetup – You’re going to die + no one will care – to share my doodles more readily, and I guess that’s become my ‘thing’.

Visuals are important to me of course, so I made sure that my personal brand and the Carbon Orange brand look consistent across all platforms. (profile pics, header graphics etc. And the tone of voice is authentic and ours.

3. What is the no. 1 thing that makes a brand or a person memorable in your opinion? 

Authenticity. When you can feel a personality shining through, with no pretence of perfection.

4. Who would you nominate to this list and why?

I nominated Adelina Chalmers, who is consistently helpful, clear in her messaging, has her own visual brand as well that’s very personal to her.

Mark Littlewood/Business of Software: Again, the tone of voice, the drive to be genuinely helpful, which follows through to how their conferences are run. (For example, providing quiet spaces for introverted folk. Really cool.)

Chris Spalton – writes truly in his own voice, amazing visuals, relentlessly helpful.

Of course Andrew and Pete!

Chris Spalton – Chris Spalton

1. What does your brand stand for? 

Okay – so I guess my ‘brand’ stands for: Being authentic to yourself, both positives and negatives. Acceptance and support of others, I always try (not always successfully) to be a ‘better person’. I believe you are your work and your work is you, so that’s why I tweet and post a wide range of stuff both personal and professional if you like ‘me’ you should be into what I do and vice versa.

I’d like to think I’m honest and authentic, self-aware of my skills and limitations, but also what I’m good at. I’d hope that I come across as compassionate, and supportive, especially of independent artists and ‘amateurs’ (like from my talk).

2. What is the no. 1 thing that makes a brand or a person memorable in your opinion? 

I guess that’s also what makes a brand memorable to me, just being true to yourself and your beliefs and being authentic. I’m not a fan of people who try and make out they’re cleverer than they are, particularly in the design world. Just be honest and true to what you stand for, talk like people talking to other people.

Berenice Smith – www.hellolovely.design

1. What does your brand stand for? How did you go around creating your brand and making sure it gets the right message across and connects with the right people?

My brand is focussed on three key words – clarity, creativity and communication. These tie into my business goals which act as directives which means I connect with the clients I would like to work with. Plus a dollop of flexibility as I review and adapt.

2. What is the no. 1 thing that makes a brand or a person memorable in your opinion? 

A number 1 thing that makes a brand is the person. In these changing times, I feel that we’ve all become more aware of the people behind the news and the stories. A person with matching values and empathy makes a good brand. 

3. Who would you nominate to this list and why?

My nominations were @MillRoadSummer who have turned a difficult summer into an uplifting story. I also love Dinky Doors for creating such a vibrant and quirky project whilst actually having no visible person which goes against my number 1 thing! 

Diana Probst – dianaprobst.com

1. What does your brand stand for? How did you go around creating your brand and making sure it gets the right message across and connects with the right people?

My brand is, particularly, me. I’m an artist and prototyper, and my personality is at the forefront of what I do. That makes connections easy because it is almost all networking and word of mouth, so while growth is slow it has a long trail of repeat custom.

2. What is the no. 1 thing that makes a brand or a person memorable in your opinion? 

To me, brands are remembered if they are socially interesting or visually beautiful.

Melanie Fielden – Pioneer Chicks

1. What does your brand stand for?

Making business, personal development and networking fun and building supportive communities of women whereby together we grow faster.

2. How did we go around creating our brand and making sure it gets the right message across and connects with the right people?

I carefully planned the visual branding to look fun, colourful and inviting – not too professional, to build a community of women that are also fun and friendly. I chose 4 brand identity words that we stand by in everything that we do: bold, feminine, authentic and relevant. So with every customer interaction (email, phone call, comment on social media, face-to-face interaction, etc) we think about whether we’re remaining truthful to these identity keywords. Because it’s my business, it was important that the branding also matched my personality and my style seems as I was be playing a key role in the business. There was no point in starting a business that was the opposite to me! I’d not enjoy it and we would lose the ‘authentic’ part of the branding immediately.

3. What is the no. 1 thing that makes a brand or a person memorable in your opinion?

How they make you feel! It’s often been said that you may not remember what a person has said, but you remember how they made you feel – I totally agree with that. If someone makes me feel happy, confident or excited, I’m going to remember them. Also, because I like fashion, a person with a unique style stands out to me.

4. Who would I nominate and why?

On Instagram: @mycambridgefairytale – Paola Salvaire – this lady has such an amazing Instagram feed that I can relate to. Her pictures of her home always give me a warm, fuzzy feeling – especially when they include her beautiful cat! And when she occasionally posts pictures of herself, she has a fantastic 40s/50s style that I love!

Sarah Law – I’ve only met her recently (at your meetup!) but she made an instant impression. Her personality and enthusiasm are infectious and her story is mesmerising. Sarah is utterly inspiring, having managed to quit her job and do her own thing, now only working 15 hours a week and making a good living! Plus she’s a bikini model with a huge amount of determination and is smashing her way through European competitions. Just utterly inspiring and with an amazing attitude and personality.

Christian Pratt

1. What does your brand stand for?

My brand is me (though I also manage my employer’s brand). The three ‘what I stand for’ words in my LinkedIn bio are: clarity, consistency and integrity. As a marketer, I also strongly believe in professionalism (regardless of the profession).

2. How did you go around creating your brand and making sure it gets the right message across and connects with the right people?

Self-reflection, conversations with friends and family, feedback from colleagues. I get the right message across by conveying my values through my behaviour. I end up connecting with the right people by being open to opportunities and experiences.

3. What is the no. 1 thing that makes a brand or a person memorable in your opinion?

Consistency.

4. Who would you nominate to this list and why?

In a Cambridge context, Joe Glover. He’s figured out his thing and has placed it front and centre in his career.

Kelly Molson – Mob Happy & kellymolson.co.uk

1. What does your brand stand for? How did you go around creating your brand and making sure it gets the right message across and connects with the right people?

My personal brand encompasses the things I believe in, the things I stand for.

Women in digital and how we can inspire more women agency owners

It’s the reason I founded Mob Happy and actively strive to encourage and promote others in the industry. I set out to create a platform for women doing brilliant things in the industry which has been an incredible learning resource for myself and others.

Infertility and IVF and loss

I’ve always spoken very openly about our infertility struggles and journey with IVF, and it was important to me to normalise this, allowing me to own the narrative, rather than be owned by it. Speaking about it at agency related events, making it part of personal and work conversations has helped me immensely and given others a voice to share their own experiences.

Making things better

This may seem a little generic, but ultimately I have a strong need to improve and make things better – for clients, for the team, for the community. 

We have a vision at Rubber Cheese:

“Make a positive change to the global visitor attraction market. Improve how visitor attractions interact, engage and delight their guests online to deliver a better, more enjoyable and accessible experience.” 

You’ll often see me share articles around this, how attractions can be more universally accessible for everyone. 

I believe that once you begin to talk about the things you care for openly, your personal brand develops quite naturally – I don’t feel I have to work at it as such, because the things you talk about make you memorable. I share articles and opinions on the topics across Twitter and LinkedIn mainly, and I’m often tagged in posts others know I’ll enjoy or have thoughts on – so I guess whatever I’m doing is working.

2. Who would you nominate to this list and why?

We’ve never met, but I follow Dominic McGregor – COO of The Social Chain.

I’ve always been impressed with his openness around sobriety and mental health, alongside the great work they achieve at the agency. 

For me, it’s always been the personal things that people are open enough to share that make them more memorable to me. I have huge admiration for anyone that shares deeply personal experiences to help others.

Angie Moyes – Fuz

1. What does your brand stand for? How did you go around creating your brand and making sure it gets the right message across and connects with the right people?

Being in the business of branding, like most designers – the most difficult brand to create is your own. Even though you know your own clients, and the work you like to do, it’s still difficult to be objective about yourself. When you are working for a client, you are working towards a goal, usually a deadline for a rebrand, or campaign. You’ve worked out and agreed on a budget, you’re part of a team. So the only way you can effectively brand for yourself is to become your own client or hire another designer… which does work in large agencies, but not for any self-respecting consultant designer I know. Tantamount to cheating in an exam. 

So, you need to get on with working out the ’‘why’ you bother’, because really – that’s what it’s all about.

I’d like to say that I had a big idea when I set out on my own over 20 years ago, but like a lot of independents, I had a couple of redundancies, and being in the ‘sales & marketing’ area of the business, meant that I was considered an overhead in tough times. My drive in the beginning was survival I guess, being in charge of my own destiny – and it was scary, but I was resolute. And that’s the very thing that connected me to business owners, small ones, big ones, one-man-band ones. We all want to be in charge of our own destiny. To fulfil our dreams (whatever that might be). To believe in ourselves, our own power. To bring our product to other people, because we know we can make their lives better, for me it’s their business lives, but for a manufacturing company it could be a life-saving widget, or software, or … fill in the gap.

So, my branding is about ideas, dreams and possibilities. It was important that I didn’t use a stock image, it was important that I was the focus, because that’s what my clients buy – my creativity to their table.

Final thoughts…

Wow! As you can see, personal branding is such an impactful aspect of business and something that can differentiate you from other professionals in your marketplace. It’s also a topic that generates enormous value when we start discussing it. 

But once you’ve established and promoted what it is you stand for, your work doesn’t finish there. Personal branding is an ongoing process and one that you may find evolves over time until you find your perfect position.

I hope you’ve learnt a few things from this post – I know I certainly have!

If you know anybody in Cambridge(shire) who should be included or you’d like to contribute to this blog with your own thoughts, tweet me @lenkakopp and we’ll get your additions added to this post.

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